worclip:

Leap Spring Stool (2014) by David Vivanco

The Leap Stool was born in a year where the physical characteristics of the materials were the main thing to consider when using the various properties of the elements for a fun material. Thus, an ergonomic and efficient stool. 
The stool consists of a structure that is based on the flexible pieces that overlap each other, giving you the time to feel when it is compressed as it adapts to your posture and weight; while it gives you a more fun and dynamic interaction, it always invites you to “jump” on it. 
All this thanks to the incredible flexibility and strength of beech, as well as the hardness and beauty of Encino wood.
Zoom Info
worclip:

Leap Spring Stool (2014) by David Vivanco

The Leap Stool was born in a year where the physical characteristics of the materials were the main thing to consider when using the various properties of the elements for a fun material. Thus, an ergonomic and efficient stool. 
The stool consists of a structure that is based on the flexible pieces that overlap each other, giving you the time to feel when it is compressed as it adapts to your posture and weight; while it gives you a more fun and dynamic interaction, it always invites you to “jump” on it. 
All this thanks to the incredible flexibility and strength of beech, as well as the hardness and beauty of Encino wood.
Zoom Info
worclip:

Leap Spring Stool (2014) by David Vivanco

The Leap Stool was born in a year where the physical characteristics of the materials were the main thing to consider when using the various properties of the elements for a fun material. Thus, an ergonomic and efficient stool. 
The stool consists of a structure that is based on the flexible pieces that overlap each other, giving you the time to feel when it is compressed as it adapts to your posture and weight; while it gives you a more fun and dynamic interaction, it always invites you to “jump” on it. 
All this thanks to the incredible flexibility and strength of beech, as well as the hardness and beauty of Encino wood.
Zoom Info
worclip:

Leap Spring Stool (2014) by David Vivanco

The Leap Stool was born in a year where the physical characteristics of the materials were the main thing to consider when using the various properties of the elements for a fun material. Thus, an ergonomic and efficient stool. 
The stool consists of a structure that is based on the flexible pieces that overlap each other, giving you the time to feel when it is compressed as it adapts to your posture and weight; while it gives you a more fun and dynamic interaction, it always invites you to “jump” on it. 
All this thanks to the incredible flexibility and strength of beech, as well as the hardness and beauty of Encino wood.
Zoom Info

worclip:

Leap Spring Stool (2014) by David Vivanco

The Leap Stool was born in a year where the physical characteristics of the materials were the main thing to consider when using the various properties of the elements for a fun material. Thus, an ergonomic and efficient stool. 

The stool consists of a structure that is based on the flexible pieces that overlap each other, giving you the time to feel when it is compressed as it adapts to your posture and weight; while it gives you a more fun and dynamic interaction, it always invites you to “jump” on it. 

All this thanks to the incredible flexibility and strength of beech, as well as the hardness and beauty of Encino wood.

schalling:

Hans Wegner “The dolphin chair” or JH-510 designed in 1951, produced by Johannes Hansen in Denmark. 

schalling:

Hans Wegner “The dolphin chair” or JH-510 designed in 1951, produced by Johannes Hansen in Denmark. 

In 1979, when the minimum wage was $2.90, a hard-working student with a minimum-wage job could earn enough in one day (8.44 hours) to pay for one academic credit hour. If a standard course load for one semester consisted of maybe 12 credit hours, the semester’s tuition could be covered by just over two weeks of full-time minimum wage work—or a month of part-time work. A summer spent scooping ice cream or flipping burgers could pay for an MSU education. The cost of an MSU credit hour has multiplied since 1979. So has the federal minimum wage. But today, it takes 60 hours of minimum-wage work to pay off a single credit hour, which was priced at $428.75 for the fall semester.

The Myth of Working Your Way Through College - Svati Kirsten Narula - The Atlantic (via infoneer-pulse)

typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
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typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
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typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
Zoom Info
typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
Zoom Info
typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
Zoom Info
typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
Zoom Info
typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
Zoom Info
typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
Zoom Info
typostrate:

Brassneck
Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!
Follow Typostrate on:
Zoom Info

typostrate:

Brassneck

Post Projects is a Vancouver based graphic art and design studio that began with the partnership of Alex Nelson and Beau House. They currently work with a network of local and international specialists on creative projects that include identity & branding, print media, and interactive development. An oft-repeated phrase in the Post Projects studio is: “It could be better”. Creating up to higher performance the two designers give their best with every client. Enjoy their work for Brassneck brewery!

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worclip:

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.



The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).

It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
Zoom Info
worclip:

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.



The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).

It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
Zoom Info
worclip:

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.



The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).

It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
Zoom Info
worclip:

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.



The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).

It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
Zoom Info
worclip:

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.



The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).

It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
Zoom Info

worclip:

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.

The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).

It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born.